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: in the new environment, our party faces many severe challenges. >> since then, the president's promised big reform, meant to shift the economy from fast paced to sustainable growth. those reforms are sure to be on the agenda at the national people's congress where investors hope the new administration will show they plan to walk the talk of reforms. investment house barclay's expects the government's anti-corruption drive to pick up speed after president xi jinping speeded up a campaign aimed at rooting out -- the brokerage, like many other firms hopes to see changes that would make the economy more account oriented. measures to help liberalize the financial sector and allow the currency to trade more freely. >> china policymakers are interested in bringing in more exchange rate flexibility. they need to have that before they open up their capital economy. >> reforms have raised awareness that this environmental problem can quickly become a social one. the pollution is a rut of years of double digit growth, no longer expected with the new leadership. most investors believe the government wi
they are thriving in this environment? >> yes. >> these black-and-white lemurs like their food so much so that -- i will admit it made me a bit uncomfortable to say the least. thankfully, the giant galapagos tortoises don't get as excited about mealtime. in fact, they can live months without food. this one is 30 years old. new 18 becausee she will live to be 200. ofnson has spent hundreds thousands of dollars on animal conservation. in addition to torres and lemurs, a shelter some rare birds. >> this one here was born blind and they are hand feeding him. he's doing very well. right there. the scarlet ibis was once native to this area of the caribbean. by the time richard moved here, there wasn't a single one left. >> i figure because they were so beautiful, they were killed for their feathers and disappeared. >> but richard branson has big plans for them. >> once we have enough here, they will start moving out to other islands and hopefully the british virgin islands it will have scarlet ibis and flamingos in all the ponds. >> but if i were an animal here, i would never leave. >> don't do that. >>
regulatory environment, it is very difficult for banks to josep juy taking a risk if it defaults and it will take them three years to resolve that situation. in states like california, lender can get sued by a defaulted bar were for making a relatively minor error in the servicing or lending process. a lot of risks. >> the regulatory environment is not helping. what should the regulatory environment be? you have to have some rules. >> some of the rules were put in place that are very good. contact for the bar were. putting in place a really normative standard for making a loan. disclosure. all the things you heard about during the crisis. >> what about for the banks? agree -- we totally don't need to see the new agency that came out of the dodd frank law telling the banks with the price of mortgages ought to be. we should not have legislated the way that prepayment penalties work. as a low credit score bar were its mortgage come your score goes up immediately. another lender will come in and refinance you. that first lender will lose money. they're not going to do that. >> mark f
the next few quarters, driving profitability as well. number three, the environment as a whole, it seems that investors continue to discount the upside and are very cautious. we will not see returns like 2013, but we are still bullish as a whole. >> in the last conference call we kept hearing about companies guiding downwards. so much m&a. how do you account for that? >> that is a concern, not everything is rosy and perfect, but there are concerns out there and you have seen an environment over the last few years where every quarter they learn a is part of thech regulatory environment that we are in. they overpromise and underdeliver and could potentially be on the hook for money. it down. which is not to say that you should ignore these things. you want to look at it. but you need to do your homework and look at what is happening in terms of corporate earnings. generally speaking, and our view, if the company continues to take market share away from competitors in in industry that continues to grow, they must reflect in the numbers at some point. maybe not this quarter or the next quart
you indicate that the unemployment rate, in his current environment, with 6.7% -- with longer unemployment, is not like 6.6% unemployment in normal times? >> but mike, how do you communicate that? >> it will be difficult to do that and you will have speeches you make to give people guidance on what is going forward. i want to ask about the statement of inflation not being a problem. betting that inflation will rise over the coming months and the question is, how much is slack is there. on bloomberg surveillance tomorrow -- they argued it -- he will argue, this is much more dangerous than people think. saywill see chairman yellen that they will follow strict policy that will look at the labor market for reasons that we mentioned but this is not the only thing they will look at. they will go day to day to make sure they are not too soft. >> what kind of market can ben bernanke handoff to janet yellen? >> i would much rather be in her spot than his spot in 2008. i think that ben bernanke did a wonderful job of communicating that we are moving to tapering, and handing chairperson
environment is nothing to complain about. >> and what about the personal and commercial banking business, one of the biggest segments of what you guys do. what kind of demand trends are you seeing? >> well, again, there's clearly a slow down on the consumer side, but we're coming off, you know, double digit growth rates, and we're now moving into midsingle digit growth rates. part half is intended. our government has taken an approach to try to slow down consumer debt levels and it's having an impact which i say is a good thing. when you look at loan demand on the commercial side, it remains very strong. as i say, investment demand, deposit demand has been very good. so when you look at the overall platform, it grew at 7% this year -- or this past quarter over quarter, and so it's a slightly slower environment, but as i say not all that bad. >> i mean, we talk about the good quarter you just completed, but you've had a good year at rbc, but don't you feel like the easy money, to use that term, is done now? you guys are going to have to work a little harder to keep that growth rate going, don'
, effectively? >> well, it's hard. it's going to be a significant trading range environment. the market will correct back on a repeating basis. we'll get a period where the market doesn't accomplish a heck of a lot. that's all you should expect. >> you watched janet yellen yesterday. did he provide the confidence that you would have wanted? and the reason i ask is because historically, if you just do the math, every time we get a new chair in this role, we usually have some form of a correction within six months. and the question that i keep wondering is whether we have that correction or it's still to come. >> i think, you know, investors tend to react to the unexpected, not the expected. and yesterday, the messaging was steady as she goes. so i think for now, we're in good shape. the march meeting, unless data falls off the cliff, investors will expect and will treat another $10 billion in tapering to occur. so i think we hand off from bernanke to yellen in this case may be a little different. because she was pretty much on tune with the dovishness of the fed and there hasn't been a f
, talks were dominated by a cooling economy and rising concerns about the environment. tom, manufacturing pmi over the weekend fell slightly. is that a sign of the reaction of weakening growth? is a bit of both. at pmi trajectory came in 50.2, down from 50.5 in january. so it is still slightly above the 50 mark, which is improving from deteriorating conditions. deceleration in the manufacturing sector. the big question is is this to do with february, which this year had the chinese new year holiday, or is it a reflection -- a reflection of genuine problems in the manufacturing sector? pmi?at is the reaction to has rebranded to past 55 from the record low of 53 in january. theome evidence that in domestic economy, and the services sector, it is actually doing slightly better. yuan hasrse, the weakened significantly over concerns. have the npc kicking off this week. what does this mean for the government's broader growth strategy? >> one of the concerns is that a weakening yuan is a reflection of lower investor confidence in china. be deliberate strategy by the people's bank of china. they
position to capitalize and stay upon the improving housing environment in the u.s. >> as you pointed out closing the sales gap, if you had two stocks to buy you'd buy both of them? >> i think by the way i position it, both companies are in the right position to benefit from housi housing. home depot is better positioned. >> gross margin 44.6%, is that a number in line with what you were the examining in. >> that's a good number just like with home depot, a lot of disruption with the weather but in both cases the gross margins held up well despite what could have been a negative makeshift in margin products. >> the at the end of the day you look at the weather situation, this is a company that probably helped out by the weather because they were able to respond quickly? >> probably. the way i think about it, it was probably some weather benefit, a lot of snow removal type products but the real key is going to be as temperatures warm, as the spring finally comes there will be a lot of pent of demand and repair spending at lowe's and home depot and that will be positive for the first quarte
on top of it a light sensor, suddenly you are responding to the environment. what we do is make the kits and we see this consistently, people buy the kits and then come back and buy another kit, then they come back and buy individual bits. >> what's the repeat customer rating? >> right now between 15% and 20%. it's something that we continue to try to grow. obviously a lot of the first two years of the business have been about building the core customer base and the core product line. >> when i think of lego, one of the interesting things about it, they run their manufacturing operations and have amazing quality control. you can take them from this year and they still work with legos 50 years ago. do you worry about because you're open source someone else could take your designs and manufacture them more cheaply? >> we have a very balanced kind of approach to open source where we trademark our name and still hold patents for the connector and the system in general, so ultimately if you want to make something you want to call little bit compatible, it would have to come after being vetted
, radio shack had a tough time in that environment, 4.5%, cutting the management they don't need, and earnings per share beating profit on a ride so sales were still little tricky but stock is doing well. adam: the s and p is on track for record close and the dow is climbing back from earlier losses, 35 points, mixed economic news. turmoil in ukraine, testimony on the hill, an opportunity to address concerns regarding recent soft economic data. >> since my appearance before the house committee on number of data releases point to softer spending. part of that softness may reflect weather conditions. is difficult to discern how much. adam: joining us is oppenheimer funds chief economist, how much of a player is the weather in the south economic data? >> they asked me to come back in april or may and i will tell you. if you didn't buy a house you didn't buy a car because of a blizzard, you might buy it later on. you didn't go out to dinner, that is pretty much spending this law so it is hard to say i was looking at history of past times, got a fight after a particularly bad winters,
a better environment. >> why? so many companies run so poorly? >> i think you have a market that is fair value, plus or minus. it is not overshadowed particularly. corporate are healthy. financials are well capitalized. interest rates are low. company balance sheets are filled with cash. private equities trading over one billion dollars. unclogged capital commitments. ironically in environment where you have low growth means that they are much more receptive to value trading ideas. that lends itself to a very fertile environment for what we do. take one case example. yesterday you filed a 13 tnd with one of your companies, huge, employees 60,000 people. you want to talk to the board about pretty much everything, right? management, capital structure, other stuff. what ultimately are you trying to achieve here you go -- achieve here you go -- achieve here? several pretty much everything. >> is there that much wrong with the company? >> there are a lot of things right with the company. but all of those things you articulated -- i'm very confident we will be able to work things out amicably.
. >> would you say they are thriving? >> arriving in this environment in the environment? yes. >> it made me a bit uncomfortable, to say the least. giant tortoises do not get as excited about meal time. in fact, they can live months without food. this one is 30 years old. 30 may be the new 18 because she will live to 200. ransom spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on animal conservation. in addition, he shelters rare birds. >> this was warned blind. hand feeding him. doing very well. there.e one right this was once native to this area of the caribbean. by the time richard moved here, not a single one left. >> i think because they are so beautiful, they were killed. >> richard branson has a plan for them. >> once we have enough here, they will start having to other islands. hopefully the british virgin islands will have the flamingos and all the ponds. >> if i were an animal, i would never leave. >> don't do that. i did not like it when all of the lemurs were crawling all over me. they have nails. were climbing up my legs. >> if he is successful, and you are talking about the crimson bird,
issues. >> the environment is right for this. but how many of these guys do you think -- how many new guys are coming into the space? guys that think, hey, this is working for the other guys. the other part of this question is, you used to work at a big hedge fund managgazine, that cos hedge funds directly. are they saying there's a lot of pretenders in this space in not everyone can be dan lobe. and a lot of the guys that are playing this game are not experts in the field. >> i think investors in hedge funds recognize that. and they dump their money with the big brand names that we cover all day long, like the icahns and the lobes. but there's proteges that come out. keith meister was a protege of icahn. another out of pershing square. there are some. but for some, it's the hedge fund manager that get the attraction. >> big money, thanks for stopping by. otherwise known as lawrence delevingne. >> he should change his twitter. >> get a tattoo. >> a big dollar sign. right there. >>> let's trade this here. some might say, guy adami, that activism and activists create their own cycle. an
and blind development. we must strengthen the economic environment and resolve to take forceful measures to complete this challenging task. >> now, we heard the announcements from before and there are many people who are worried about whether or not the government at the end of the day is really going to be willing to sacrifice growth in order to try to push through some of these reforms and address some of on these issues, not only on pollution, but also on debt. in terms of pollution, people are saying that if you really want to shut down a lot of these factory webs you could end up with a lot of workers who don't have any place to go. that is one of the main concerns that could actually leave some questions in people's minds as to whether or not the government will be able to push ahead and make these changes, julia. >> thank you. and if i also noticed a 12.5% rise in their defense budget, too. we've seen expressions of concern before the japanese, which is perhaps surprising. is that a waste of money? what's the feedback been on that rise? i know it's something they seem to do everyt
to run my state the bay i want to. let me make the environment such that i can promote jobs in my own state. i don't need the federal government doing this for me. >> but i think you need to look at the entire tax code. do you realize -- >> but you shouldn't be paying 15% when people making less than you are paying a higher rate. >> but if i -- >> that nibt be the case for you. you pit it in harm's way, you're investing it? >> that's another way to say it. >> depending on what you're doing could be putting it in harm's way to lose it. >> put in bitcoins. >> but when you're putting other people's money in harm's way, this goes back to what we talked about before, as the private equity manager, why is that -- why is that the not a commission oriented business? >> when you see somebody make $500 million of which a large portion of it is in carried pictures. that's what private equity is. i redeploy it all the time. i'm constantly buying new deals. why would you want me to stop doing that? >> it's not a matter of punishing you. it's a matter of giving you special status. and i'm not argui
room in a portfolio for equities in an environment of low rates, even if they're going higher, they're going higher in a very slow fashion, if you want. growth is subdued but is still supportive. so that's overall an environment where you want to be in stocks. >> you know, you're the big picture type of investor, and the big picture for the u.s. market for the last four years has been all of the easy money policy from the federal reserve and plenty of people feel like that's why we are sitting at all-time highs right now. so why wouldn't it reverse itself as the fed begins to pull back on the easy money and even if it starts to raise interest rates sooner rather than later, why isn't this a time when the market starts to retreat, where are we still going higher now? >> well, i think although, you know, we're expecting a normalization of rates at some point in the future, we're not talking about something very quick or very drastic. and at the same time the world is healing from its traumatic experience, if you want, from the crisis. so all of this is supportive. now, actually, clear
agitating these days. stay with us because i want to ,alk about the deal environment this onslaught of investor activism we are seeing. sweeneynging in paul and merger arbitrage strategist. let's start with joseph a bank in this saga that is going on in the men's retail sector. it is interesting they seem to be going back-and-forth. ultimately, who wins? >> i've been covering this from the beginning. i am more than aware of what is going on. the biggest issue here is the timing. when you look at the release, it said we need to do this quickly. if you're going to give us your best offer, give it to us right now because if you're not, we will close this eddie bauer d eal. that is what is happening now and they need the due diligence to increase the price to $65 and maybe more. it is not $65 in cash. it could be stock. men's wearhouse has the door open to close this transaction. activist fieldhe with ebay and paypal. is rattling the cages on almost a daily basis. he was on with me a couple of against pushing heavily the paypal spinoff. one thing he is trying to get investors to pay att
promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ but if you cholose your eyes does it always feel like nothing's aged at all ♪ ♪ and if you close your eyes does it almost feel like ♪ >>> time now for cramer and "stop trading" jim. >> the idea that craft beer may have peaked and going back to buds, people are bud izzing abo that. boston beer numbers is not what we expected, this sam. and anheuser-busch, inbev, grade number turnaround in brazil and mexico, huge places that drink beer. is it a trend that can continue? if boston beer wants to spend less money they can show better gross margins. but this deal worked out. and worked out for constellation. the beer market's good. i don't want to make too much of the idea that craft beer has peaked but people will reach that conclusion. >> spirits taking a lot of share overall. >> diagio reported a quarter that was not so hot and the stock came back. if people want to take a real close look at boston beer they're no
to incentives and health systems incentive changes, to less expensive environments that include clinics and home care. we're in the midst of a big transition overall. >> what is it that your company does exactly when you go in and try and streamline things? >> we're a performance improvement company that focuses on cost, in other words, how you procure all products. we have a $5 billion procurement business that helps hospitals buy what they buy, more importantly, how they use the products. there's a best practice out there but it's not used across the country. we take the process to what we know as best practices. >> you're trying to get people paid quicker, right? i mean, there's a million places to attack. are there too many -- what are your two or three primary ways of doing it? you can get bogged down being all things to all people. >> hospitals aline are over a trillion dollars vertically integrated in 5,000 locations, all very complex and all very different. we focus on cost reduction, clinical integration and payment and price integration so that what's being paid for the services render
to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. liz: shares of best buy on the move to be profit expectations lee janzen analyst at janney montgomery scott, you were on a conference, what did you hear that surprise you? >> 18 months ago this country everyone thought was going out of business, actually argued today. and hybrid models are out there that the investments they make, the ones they're working on, making tough to compete with online. liz: will they have o downstairs' their retail store even more? >> they have markets where they have more density of stores than they need and over time it is inevitable that will happen. there taking hours out of the store because 12% of their business is now online. some productivity you don't need as much investment in energy and a. liz: the chart looks negative, the stock fell off a cliff. you sound positive. is there an opportunity? >> it is an opportunity. proof of concept will come in queue 4. even though they had lower number
world and they're going to continue to do so. >> are we still in a low interest rate environment despite the fact the fed is tapering? is that your assessment? >> i am quite sure we'll will be in a low interest rate environment. confidence,more , westing more into equities brought in richard buxton and his team and he has ready well -- his ability and pounds his ability and pounds over the last six months. we're seeing people invest more. end of the day, you do not get much return if you've got cash or fixed interest. looks what can you do to counter that -- >> what can you do to counter that when yields remain low? what are you doing to counter that. >> we look at our customers and look at their risk tolerances and we decide -- designed to portfolios to meet those risks. if you're willing to take a bit more risks, they're our alternative products. we believe advice is really important for people. -- we are buying the largest network of restricted an independent financial advisers because we think our proposition is good for solutions. we believe we can expand our offering in the u.k.. >
at morgan stanley is still bullish, saying look, in this type of environment it's all about growth, even though you do have some big valuations in certain sectors within tech. that's where the growth is and that's where you see investors going and particularly on a day like today, they are flocking towards a tech-heavy nasdaq index. >> understandably so. thanks, sheila. appreciate it very much. >>> the dow is having its best day of the year. we are up almost 218 points on the trading session. now bob pisani is here. it's lifting almost all boats today. >> that's right. earlier today it was ten to one advancing to declining stocks. relief rally's a good way to describe this given what happened yesterday and the strength of the rally. midcap, historic high. small cap, russell 2000 at an historic high. the volatility in the vix, remember yesterday it went from 14 to 16? it went back down to 14 today, indication that tensions are easing. we don't know why. it was always unclear what the military action would be. it seems very clear we don't know what's going to happen but tanks are not going
being the low interest-rate environment. qwest also, companies are doing well. our corporate clients are doing nicely. >> are they willing to spend? you are an advertising guy. spends expected to grow by three or four percent. i think the uncertainty about the fiscal policy is --sing corporations >> what would give you more confidence that you know exactly what to expect about taxation policy and health care reform, etc.. there is no indication about what the final outcome would be. 70% of the business are outside of america. they are in china and russia and brazil. those markets are growing. each one differently, but china, i read yesterday, seven or eight percent growth in the economy. not nine or 10% of where it was. i do not see anything on the horizon. there is nothing on the horizon that gives you consternation and says the fundamentals of the --nomy >> the fed has been it's a much money. qwest we produced a surplus. you noticed the fiscal reform has been so uncertain. as a result, they cut expenses. the canadian mindset is you have to have a bounce budget. qwest we have john k
environment. 1.8% to 3%. we're seeing again a wall of worries this year, the fed tapering what will happen with interest rates. we needed economy to get stronger. fundamentally we need the fed and stimulus to help and ultimately to lead to stronger economy. we're starting to see that. back to energy, it is going to remain strong and robust regardless of what is going on with the broader economy. we're just replacing domestic supply for foreign supply. and we're hedged, liz. we're not, u.s. dollars we're paying as u.s. dollars we're getting. so we're not worried about foreign currency pllying u.s. energy. liz: ah-ha. he doesn't have the same problems gap might have, david. david: thank you very much. larry, chris, we're going to see you back here in couple minutes when the s&p futures close. thanks very much, guys. liz: stocks soaring 121% in the last year and new milestone for this company, trip advisor. 150 million reviews. up next, we've got the ceo talking about expansion, future of travel and the current quarter. did the weather hit its bottom line or will it prove the stocks deserves
would not be interested in jcpenney really at all right now simply because of the macro environment for lower income consumer right now. we feel they will be under greater pressure going forward as obamacare rolls out. as the fact we're seeing wage growth being negative for that segment of the consumer. we wouldn't actually look at jcpenney for those specific reasons. david: attorney any, our brother there, todd horowitz at the cme, he think that is the start money is getting out of this market. the money that is coming into the market are retail investors and it is a suckers game right now which you say what? >> i'm going to have to say there are two trend we're watching right now. the last time we had a bear market it was followed up by the 10-year treasury in nominal gdp growth. so as the, as the 10-year yield started to come close to the -- david: tony, i'm going to stop you right there. none of this, get to the point. is this a sucker's game right now? is the smart money getting out? >> i don't think so. the fed will continue to have easy monetary policy. i think it is clear. t
or not we have business-friendly environment in this country. coming from a guy deep the in numbers, senior economist for federal bank of chicago, do you see a business-friendly environment in this country right now? >> that is another good question. in terms of business-friendly there is regulatory side and i think there is a general sense of uncertainty and hesitancy that, that potential entrepreneurs or even workers looking to move from job to job might face or feel like they face in terms of kind of pulling the trigger, whether moving to another job or generating growth at their company. i think in terms of the business climate, i've been concerned for a few years now about the hesitancy. so, one example i give in some research i've done with coauthors, looking how firms higher and -- hire and how much effort they put into the recruiting effort. if we look at recent data from john openings and labor statistics survey, we see vacancy rate, job vacancy rate, firms are posting recovered pretty well. it is still not where it was but recovered pretty well since the end of the recession but t
but the market generally speaking is going up. scott, in that kind of environment are there any companies you see with lowhave wages out there? >> yeah, i think consumer, that is a good point, consumers are spending more of their money on heating their homes right now. i think there is a lot of pent-up demand we'll see later on. look at general motors, very inexpensive company. they're doing all the ride things. average age of a car in this country is 11 years old. of put 15,000 miles a year on car, do the math. a lot of miles on them. you have a long replacement cycle ahead. i think you have also companies have stumbled. coach is a good example. had a fashion mistake. had some competitors come in but with very valuable brand and reasonably prices. i think the companies do well once people realize the consumer not in as bad of a shape as some fear. david: kim, you like boeing. i have to push back a bit on boeing. >> sure. david: they make big airliners and sell airlines to emerging market countries and those countries have not been doing so well lately, have they? >> no they haven't but we're loo
or the other, we're going to higher rates. what are the best investments in the environment then? >> i think when we talk about higher rates we have to talk about how much higher they go. two-year -- i mean, ten-year at a 260 kind of level. our anticipation is you will probably see something closer to half a point or 50 basis point rise. so i don't think that the rise in interest rates is going to be all that dramatic. but we really like municipal bonds in here especially for high net worth individual who is in a high tax bracket. there's unbelievable opportunities today where you can go out right there and 4% to 5% tax free yields when you think about the taxable equivalent. it's very, very high. >> steph? >> so i think that we're actually on a trading range for the near term but i do agree that we are going higher for the longer term. i think we've got to get better economic data. we got some pretty good earnings for sure. and this week i thought that retail sales and earnings were certainly better than feared and expectations were so low that that's why your seeing this bounce. gross marg
work environments you can imagine. one of them told me about this thing called the banker nine to five. it's where you work from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 a.m. the next day so this is pretty common and it's a really intense culture. a lot of people get burned out very quickly. > > what happens next to these young people after working those so-called banker hours? > > well some of them stay in finance and decide to make a career of it but of the 8 young people that i followed, about half of them decided that they didn't want to be on wall street. it wasn't what they expected. they wanted the parties and the lamborghinis, and in some cases the sort of wolf of wall street culture, but what they got was something much more dull and much more harder to cope with. > > is it worth it, though, for some in the end? you work and you grind it out, but like a lot of careers out there, at the end you might have some money in your pocket. > > absolutely i think what's changed is that it's no longer the sort of guaranteed pay off. it used to be that if you put in your, your 100 hour weeks for a number of
is already baked in? >> the obamacare regulatory environment is one element of the change in health care where the cost of health care will continue to go up and software is a fundamental way to address that. we have been very active selling companies to the larger participants as they look to build up rotter solutions. >> what other subsectors of tax are hot right now? >> infrastructure software broadly. like sapy solutions and oracle. i think you can see companies like ca trying to change itself or companies that have gone private that are trying to transform companies to deliver solutions into the small and medium-size companies in the marketplace. >> one of the stocks we like to talk about is tesla. morgan stanley doubled their price target. would you buy tesla? >> i'm a technology banker and a big car guy, so i love the stock, does it have the chops to develop the solutions that? that is an unknown. it's interesting at risk dollars that may lay out in a big way or may not. it?ould you buy >> no. >> a lot of analysts still have a bye on it. we are on the market again and 30 minutes.
total vehicl vehicle . the week wage environment is also a factor here. what is the bloomberg consensus forecast? >> we are expecting a 15.4 million pace of sales. as critical. at the end of january, we had inventory on the market. sustainable set around 65. one of the reasons we had the slowdown in production was not because of the weather. it has to do with the balance of supply. we need to see the pace of sales pick up substantially. my sense here is that the weather will inhibit that. eventually the automakers will have to put in some pretty big extensions to clear those inventories out. imagine, day before march, in april, will that number spike up a little? when people start getting tax returns back. >> that's what we are expecting. you'll get a little more cash on hand. this is the year many middle-income americans are going to see the tax on their interest reduced. they may get a little less. >> about 30 seconds left. non-manufacturing data. at richmond fed survey, what's a likely to tell us? >> it remains flat. retail is taking it on the chin. at thewill probably stay level. >>
into cyclicals as we go forward at a low inflationary environment with the fed struggling. sgr >> financials were getting a little bit of a bid. maybe it was a rotation out of the over valued names. want to go back to the main point as we head into the close close. the dow is off almost 250 points. >> bear in mind, 1848 for ages, for weeks and weeks we were trying to break through the new highs, 1848. stutter steps, we finally got there then 1850 would sas resis. finally yesterday we were decisively over that. you get these stutter steps up and back. it's not -- it hasn't been a straight line up but so far since the end of january, we've been doing pretty well. february was a great month. >> the market has been pretty much straight up for the last couple weeks after that big pullback earlier this year, and i think we may be in for some more jitters. i agree with my colleagues here that, you know, some of it has to do with the weekend and the news in the ukraine, but i think there's a lot of geopolitical uncertainty. 21 elections coming up. there may be some excuses for a little pullback. >> subpr
think that that's the environment which we've been in. why are they so low? it's not because there's so much liquidity. it's because there's a lot of fear. the fed is beginning its tapering program but yet this flood of fears has overwhelmed the fed's withdrawal of some of its monthly stimulus. so i think that if we do see yields go too much lower, it's all a question of why, and i think really the reason now is because you'd see a spike in fear, and that wouldn't be a good thing, but again it's the type of thing i think you can just sort of look through and actually think that maybe in a month from now we're going to see that this is actually -- we're on to the next story. >> rates are low because there's no demand for credit. >> i continue to think that rates are low. we've seen this rally in rates this year, 40 bits in the ten-year in two months because investors really are concerned about some sort of repricing of risk and this happened two weeks after the fed tapered. that's not a coincidence. >> there's no demand for credit on the consumer side. >> if you actually look at the cons
environment? all that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 4th. >>> good evening, everyone. russia retreats and wall street gets a massive relief rally. investors bought up stocks after russian president putin pulled troops back from the border of ukraine, allaying worries about an imminent military showdown. the major averages surged 1.5% or more, posting their biggest gains so far this year. even setting a new record close for the s&p 500. now those sky-high gains wiped out all of yesterday's losses and even russia's stock market which lost 12% on monday rose more than 6% today. here's a look at the closing numbers. 9 dow soared 227 points, the nasdaq ended at a fresh 14-year high adding almost 75 points and the s & p jumped 28 points to 1873. that's a record high. over the commodities markets, what was up yesterday was down today. oil prices fell $1.59 a barrel to $103. and gold lost $12 an ounce to 1,337. >>> susie, even as russian president vladimir putin said today his country has no intention of fighting the ukranian people. international support for kiev i
modify aircrafts to make it more like a home environment. increaseden an emphasis on noise reduction in aircrafts. a sound level would only allow you to have good speech interaction within one feet of each other. we have 47 decibels. they communicate 16 feet easily. once it was identify that you could get lower, we rely, alessio far we can go. we apply a continuous and uninterrupted barrier of installation -- insulation. we isolate the component that passed through the barriers. we also have to treat the systems within the barrier already. ventilation fans and whatnot. it is about optimization. more we add, the more weight you add to the aircraft. this would be what would typically come on aircraft. but we develop an whole new only two thirds of the way, it is 10 decibels quieter or half the noise level. interior,f the basic it would be $25 million range. we will have a wide body aircraft. 747, that is just what we do from the interior completion standpoint. class coming up, the bank of nova scotia will be in the spotlight. we will speak to the ceo about the first-quarter earnings re
environment than it was in 2005 or 2006. i would hesitate to say it is over. >> let me ask you about the bay area. whenever i am here in new york i hear about silicon valley and you hear about the new silicon valley of texas. why is silicon valley continuing brightest, best and or is it? >> i think it is. at the five companies worth more than $5 billion in tech and you will find they all come from silicon valley. and then five in new york. it is a network effect. if you are a world-class engineer, where should you go? the overwhelming answer is silicon valley. and then as a result, the best executives are in silicon valley , the ones who know how to scale companies. is a predominant amount of money. the culture itself is very conducive. all of those things are designed to make it a very strong network effect. it is sort of like hollywood. how hard is it to make a movie. you can make a movie in idaho. grip,etting the best key you will not get someone as good as the guy in hollywood. that is who you are competing with, you start off at a disadvantage. what is the cultural? >> there is just tre
is that these policymakers are making decision necessary a very different growth environment that we've seen in many, many years. people are talking about how the economy is slow and is burdened with debt. there were a lot of questions about the financial sector and the health of it. and the government really doesn't have the same levers that past administrations have had in order to try to stimulate growth. so this is a back drop that they are facing at this time. the big question that people are have here going into this congress is just how will the slowing economy play with those reforms? the government has made big announcements at the end of the last week that we were going to make quite dramatic changes in a chinese contest. but we haven't really seen them walk the talk. that's what investors are going to want to see. they're going to want to see serious efforts in progress for the -- for not only the policies themselves, but also the pace of change. >> thanks so much, eunice. we'll watch for that later on this week. now, the u.s. is bracing for another massive late winter snowstorm, this time taki
environment for security and i think this is one of the things we can help bring our customers. when we show up with our technology, we're bringing our security platform with it. i think that helps customers knowing that we're there to partner with this in this new security gam bit. >> one of the things you ought me is the holy trinity. it's not right now because of connectivity. tell me why it should matter. >> we have been talking about, number one, cloud computing. you don't have to buy software or hardware. can you run the business exact lie like you use your g-mail or any other internet service. number two, facebook has redefined the social paradigm and we can use that to run our business. number three, mobile, the phone is everything. i want to do it all on the phone. but number four is this, i'll highlight it with a story. a couple weeks ago i wasn't feeling well, i had a cold in san francisco, it was a chilly day and going to a trip to the world economic forum. i got a phone call from my friend michael dell. he said are you not feeling very well? i said no but how did you know that?
the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ ♪ ♪ told ya you could do it. (dad vo) i want her to be safe. so, i taught her what i uld angot her a subaru. irl) piece of cake. ♪ (announcer) love. it's what makes a suru, a subaru. i cthis year aloneore places offi hit new and texas! see, hotwire checks the competition's rates every day... so they can guarantee their low hotel prices. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e ♪ >>> if you missed my interview with senator rand paul you can catch it on facebook at okokoko" thank you. i'm shannon bream, this is "the kelly file". >>> welcome to "hannity" tonight, we have a jam-packed edition of the show. america, are you ready? let's roll. >> we are now at a constitutional tipping point in our system. >> a liberal professor tells us why he has turned on the president. >> we have the rise of an uber-presidency. there could be no greater dan r danger. >> the planet has a fever. >> what a founding member of greenpeace says about global warming. >> there is misinforma
're in this zero interest rate environment among the g-8 in a lot of ways people are stretching to always look for yield, right? and at this point in time there's not much alpha in the fixed income world so it's driving people to always look for that opportunity. i think selectively there are tremendous opportunities in emerging markets. but you have to be careful and do your due dildiligence. >> i imagine you have a number of etfs for that, right? >> we do. and we're very happy about our new etf, too. >> be well. >> pleasure. >>> we are a few days away from jobs friday and, of course, that means another opportunity for you to nail the number and win a prize. tweets your predictions for february nonfarm payrolls. use your handle @squawkstreet and if you win, you'll receive this, cnbc hat signed by the whole "squawk on the street" team. are we going to show a video of it? i guess not. we've got it behind us. we'll sign it right now. back here, yes. very nice. sara's going to put it on right now. >> no, it will ruin my hair. >> the ear flaps will work. >> the producer called it a flapper hat. is
on the environment beyond the end of this term. it's an interesting read. >> fossil fuels, they don't like them. by the way, china in their new five five-year plan, thank you, mao, is talking about environmental cleaner. that's instrumental. you got to be able to gauge the ability to be able to see your feet in the smog there. and i know that that's where the real issues are for global warming. obviously they take our jobs. they do a lot of global warming. but we're worried about keystone. in the meantime the trucks and the trains are going to take it all. they are terrible ways. trains don't use that much pollution, but understand that when warren buffett said it's better, a big pipeline cop,mpany, but burlington northern will be the primary beneficiary so i thought he was unconflicted and also unqualified. >> very nice. down is down 27 or 29 points let's get to bob pisani on the floor. good morning. >> good morning. we started in positive territory on the s&p but we just turned negative and, of course, we were at historic highs not just there but the midcap and small cap in
c come back tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ ♪ liz: he founded the electronic arts empire and was responsible for one of the most beloved and top-selling games ever. yes, madden nfl, and now he's embarking on a whole new venture, educational gaming. joining me now in a fox business exclusive, chip hawkins. if you can company ceo and co-founder. i'm not betting against you, man. madden nfl is fascinating, but this may be a tougher sell. what's if you can? talk about that. >> well, first of all, we're named for the famous poem, "if," it starts out if you can keep your head while all about you are losing theirs, it's an empowering poem about character, and this whole idea of human knowledge that's now known as sel which stands for social and emotional learning. this is a critical area of life skills and in the last hundred years have kind of fallen in a crack, and it's now framed in a way that's been backed up by science and re
to gold and bonds and such seem to be a safer play in this environment. the fear index jumping to the biggest percentage move since early february. the vix, at the same time traders i have been talking to take these very serious headlines in stride, waiting to see what happens. is this an oversold market where you see the sectors. maybe a buying opportunity. obviously a very serious story from a broad but how does that planned the market. that is what they look at. liz: we're watching a lot of reverberation. thank you very much. the crisis in the ukraine weighing heavily on the market. the market was down 250 points, trading voluight. about 1% below the one month average. should investors becoming off the sidelines looking for bargains? if so, where? vice president of global analysis of the strategic advisory firm, and macro strategist, welcome to both of you. i will start with you, let's start macro, that's going to be longer-term issue, short-term sort of flash paper situation or something more severe? >> i would say all of the above in different phases. the biggest question
in this new method of converting customers in environments they are not typically able to shop. liz: i can point at the shoes, i can buy it from my mobile device. that is what this is. >> we put together a lot of technologies that are already out there. allow the phone to pull the data in. the clever stuff is what is happening behind the scenes acting to the e-commerce sites being able to allow the transaction to happen on the phone. i am watching a tv commercial, i can buy what is on the screen. liz: qr codes came out, it wasn't always reliable in the beginning. will you have some of those baby bums? >> i don't think so. those things that were unreliable in the past, and made sure is a reliable platform across all channels. it isn't reliable, he won't get adoption. the reason we have been clever here is we stitched together existing technologies a very elegant way to create a platform very compelling to consumers very compelling for merchants. liz: $96 million in funding thus far, that is an incredible amount of funding. where do you see this company going? >> your kernel amount of fundin
that creates an environment where investment and innovation and competition can thrive, the american people benefit. we've seen it in the wireless industry, we're seeing it in the broadband industry and the story of the media marketplace over the last 40 years since we last adopted our media rules has been one where competition has flourished. i think that's something the fcc would do well to remember when it steps into this marketplace. >> i'll tell you, sir, i mean i'm glad you're there and you're doing the lord's work. but whether it's broadband issues or the old fairness doctrine, the fcc is on the wrong side of every issue. you talk about innovation and entrepreneurship, you're right, god bless. the fcc on the wrong side, the ftc, all these independent agencies. i say get rid of them. >> part of the frustration that you have with agency comes into sharp relief when it comes to the media because we do have a core first amendment freedom. so when you combine the way that the study was created with that core fcc freedom -- first amendment freedom, i think people do rightly get concerned.
in the past has signaled a real frothy environment with companies going public after only one year of being held private. it would be a real benefit for them to start exiting right now while the ipo market is hot. they could get a decent valuation, presumably. $5 billion is what people said they were looking at. which is sizable. >> the question that people have, some cultures are very adverse to private equity. the germans call it locus. >> some people say that they do a great thing, they by companies in bad shape, turn them around, put them back on the market. others think that they play the stock market cycles correctly. things are out of favor, they pick them up and sell them on the wave. >> they get paid millions of dollars to time that correctly. sometimes it works out, sometimes it does not, but it seems to be paying off for these private equity sponsors. >> in the case of j. crew, when they took it private or last time there were multiple lawsuits involved that there was somehow collusion to get it at a cheaper price. those kinds of lawsuits are not entirely unusual, they do happen
dissonant. with that part of your thinking going in? that you wanted to create this environment that was not like happy feel-good music? the whole job from my point of view is to take you up in space with ryan and the lead character. if she was feeling overwhelmed, we needed the audience to feel like that. you look at everything you could do. always following the story and taking the audience on the journey. a let me ask you about being composer nowadays. did you think as a kid you were going to grow up and be a composer, or do you see that as the best outlet for you to now?ss creativity in music >> the main music was a thing from very young. anded to love songwriting that kind of thing. and in their early 20's i got my first job with a film composer. it was only when i started moving music around that i realized what is it could do to a story and this light went on. it after youte see a video or sometimes after you see a clip? >> sometimes you have a few thematic ideas. for me, it is always when the movie is there and you can see the performances. all of these different things
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